• Public Service Co-ordinating Bargaining Council

    Public Service Co-ordinating Bargaining Council

    A Bargaining Council positioned to advance and influence change in the labour market environment

  • Public Service Co-ordinating Bargaining Council

    Public Service Co-ordinating Bargaining Council

    Promoting sound labour relations through collective bargaining and dispute management both locally and internationally

  • Public Service Co-ordinating Bargaining Council

    Public Service Co-ordinating Bargaining Council

    Our Values
    Integrity; Efficiency; Accountability; Good Governance and Equity

  • Public Service Co-ordinating Bargaining Council

    Public Service Co-ordinating Bargaining Council

    Promoting sound labour relations through collective bargaining and dispute management both locally and internationally

  • Public Service Co-ordinating Bargaining Council

    Public Service Co-ordinating Bargaining Council

    A Bargaining Council positioned to advance and influence change in the labour market environment

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Welcome to the PSCBC

Welcome to the website for the Public Service Co-ordinating Bargaining Council (PSCBC) which aims to provide comprehensive information regarding the PSCBC as a co-ordinating bargaining council and its functions.

We trust that you will find this website both informative and of value  

Our Vision

A Bargaining Council positioned to advance and influence change in the labour market environment

Our Mission

Promoting sound labour relations through collective bargaining and dispute management both locally and internationally

Our Values

Integrity
Efficiency
Accountability
Good Governance
Equity

Facebook Posts

LABOUR NEWS:

BAD NEWS FOR SOUTH AFRICANS AS TAKE HOME BEGINS TO SHRINK – BUSINESS DAY

South African workers took home much smaller disposable salaries in August 2016 than they did in August 2015, as inflation accelerated but growth in wages slowed.
Lower disposable incomes mean households have less to spend on goods and services after paying taxes, and this affects economic growth.
The BankservAfrica disposable salary index, released on Wednesday, shows employees took home 2.5% less in August than a year earlier — the third consecutive month of declines in real disposable salaries.
"While workers received salary increases in nominal terms, the real value for these ended up being lower due to the higher rate of inflation," BankservAfrica head of knowledge and risk services Caroline Belrose said.
Inflation was 4.6% year on year in August 2015 and had accelerated to 5.9% year on year by August 2016.
Above-inflation increases in medical insurance costs and real personal income tax contributed to the growing gap between gross and net salaries, BankservAfrica said.
The disposable salary index was at risk of showing a real decline in salaries for the entire year should the current trend continue, BankservAfrica warned.
"For the first eight months, real take-home salaries declined by 0.4%," it said.
BankservAfrica, one of the largest automated clearing house and payments system operators in Africa, tracks take-home pay and pensions paid through the South African payments system on a monthly basis to compile the disposable salary index and the private pension index.
Pensions have been doing much better than disposable salaries.
Total pension payments were 13% higher in August 2016 than in August 2015, the index showed.
This suggested that the domestic economy was being kept alive by the increases that pensioners were getting rather than salaries, said Economists dotcoza chief economist Mike Schüssler.
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LABOUR NEWS:

COSATU SAYS RCL USING SPAT TO OPEN RETRENCHMENT TALKS – BUSINESS DAY

In KWAZULU-Natal, Cosatu has accused JSE-listed company RCL Foods of taking advantage of the spat between the trade union federation and former affiliate Food and Allied Workers Union (Fawu) by initiating talks about retrenchments.
However, RCL has cited the effects of chicken imports and drought on its operations as the reason behind its decision to initiate a retrenchment process that could affect up to 1,500 workers.
RCL Foods, which owns Rainbow Chicken, said on Tuesday that it was looking to restructure its commodity chicken category in response to current market conditions.
The company said operating conditions have deteriorated as a result of the increased level of dumped chicken products in the market. On average, 27,500 tonnes of chicken imports enter SA monthly, a 43% spike from 2015.
RCL Foods confirmed it has started consultations with all affected employees and unions.
"Once this has been concluded, RCL Foods will assess the impact on job numbers," the company said.
However, Cosatu in KwaZulu-Natal accused RCL Foods of taking advantage of internal fighting between it and Fawu, which has disassociated itself from Cosatu, by the company initiating restructuring talks.
Cosatu said employees at Rainbow Chicken were desperate for a workers’ organisation to intervene in the possible retrenchment process.
RCL Foods CEO Miles Dally said the group’s chicken business had operated at a loss for the past five years.
"Without immediate relief on the horizon, we have to consider a restructure of the commodity chicken component of our business," he said, stressing that RCL was not exiting the chicken business but rather down-scaling.
Rainbow Chicken workers are organised under Fawu. August Mbhele, the Fawu organiser in KwaZulu-Natal, said RCL Foods had indicated it would restructure but no section 189 process had started yet.
Mbhele said the industry was starting to buckle under a lot of pressure stemming from drought, cheap imports and high feed costs.
RCL Foods would not be the only company making this call — "we expect a lot more poultry-producing companies to restructure".
Fawu was surprised by Cosatu’s statements, he added.
"This is an attempt to confuse workers under Fawu," said Mbhele.
The possible restructuring will affect all RCL Foods workers, not just those at Rainbow Chicken.
Cosatu said of the 500 workers on chicken farms, the company intended to retrench 300. Of the 1,500 workers in processing plants, Rainbow Chicken would lay off almost 900 workers.
Cosatu’s general secretary in KwaZulu-Natal, Edwin Mkhize, said it entered the fray as a matter of principle.
"We are not going to let infighting among affiliates overshadow the workers’ plight. If workers feel they are not protected by anyone, [Cosatu] should step in."


CABLEWAY ROLLS AS WORKERS PICKET – THE TIMES

Visitors to one of South Africa's iconic tourist attractions, Table Mountain, will probably be met by a line of picketing workers today.
More than 100 workers affiliated to the South African Commercial, Catering and Allied Workers Union have resolved to embark on strike action to press their demands for bigger annual salary increases.
The workers want a 15% salary increase, while their employer - The Table Mountain Aerial Cableway Company - is offering 9%.
The workers are due to start their picket at the cableway station at 7am and have vowed to continue their action until their demands are met. However, the union said it was open to further negotiations on the pay increases.
In 2012, Table Mountain was named one of the world's New Seven Wonders of Nature and is a source of pride to the Mother City - and the rest of the country.
The Table Mountain Aerial Cableway Company - which started operating on October 4 1929 - carries more than 900000 passengers in its cable cars each year.
Saccawu regional secretary Crosby Booi said the union was determined to "show the public that workers are on strike".
"We have been trying to persuade the company to come to the party [since June this year] but unfortunately the company's position still remains the same," said Booi.
He said the lowest-paid union worker earned R3700 a month.
"Some [of the workers] are in the restaurants, some at the operational level on the ground floor, others [are] guides," he said.
The company said yesterday it would suspend some operations - such as the Wi-Fi lounge and visitors centre - but the cableway would continue to operate with a limited staff complement.
"Operational hours will be reduced and visitors impacted by this will be able to obtain a refund in line with standard terms and conditions," read a statement.
Company managing director Wahida Parker admitted there would be revenue losses.
Parker gave an assurance that if there was any disruption to the cable operation it would be stopped to ensure visitors' safety.
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LABOUR NEWS:

NUM DEMANDS 20% WAGE INCREASE-BUSINESS REPORT

Johannesburg - The National Union of Mineworkers (NUM) said the union is sticking to its 20-percent wage increase demand with Anglo Platinum.
This comes after the union reached a wage deadlock with the platinum producer. The NUM demanded a 14.5-percent wage increase, however General Secretary David Sipunzi on Monday said the union is asking for a 20-percent wage increase.
“In the platinum belt we are unfortunately a minority. However, that does not mean we do not have members there. We have submitted our demands just like every other union has.
Sipunzi, during a media briefing, said the union cannot continue demanding R12 500 for its workers.
The union said wage negotiators cannot ask for the same wages for years.
“We are demanding at least 20 percent. We know that negotiations are in the process, but we cannot be demanding R12 500 for 10 years now.”
Meanwhile, Anglo Platinum has tabled a 6.75 percent wage increase.
The union had said that such an increase offered by Amplats was an insult.
“The NUM views the offer by Anglo Platinum as an insult to thousands of helpless employees, and the union has also observed the attitude by the company refusing to close the apartheid wage gap,” said Sipunzi.
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LABOUR NEWS:

UNION AND RETAIL MOTOR SECTOR TO TALK WAGES – BUSINESS DAY

Unions and employers in the retail motor sector are expected to meet this week to discuss a revised wage offer that could avert a strike at fuel pumps and some component manufacturers.
Despite the National Union of Metalworkers of SA (Numsa) now agreeing that a deal could be structured over three years, its demand for a rethink of how collective bargaining is structured could still be a sticking point. The union wants employer bodies to agree to a process to discuss reorganising collective bargaining, which is seen as fragmented.
Negotiations were at a "sensitive stage" Numsa general secretary Irvin Jim said on Friday.
Numsa dropped a requirement for a one-year deal after it reached a three-year pay agreement in the vehicle-assembly sector earlier in September with manufacturers including BMW, Ford and Toyota. The agreement will effectively give workers a 35% increase over three years. The 2016 deal will see workers receive a 10% increase in the first year and increases of 8% in the second and third years. This is down from the 11.5% deal agreed on in 2014, but Numsa said it had "won the war", given the country’s depressed economic climate.
The deal includes a transport allowance of R1,200 a year, to rise annually, and a shift allowance of 20% in the first year, 21% in the second, 22% in 2018 and 23% in 2019. It also includes a short-time bonus and a housing solution.
The Automotive Manufacturers Employers Association said when the deal was struck that an industry framework had been agreed that would govern how the union and management at the different manufacturing plants across SA formulated their own solutions.
Despite this, a strike in the retail motor sector could still affect assembly lines if Numsa members down tools at suppliers.
Retail Motor Industry chief operating officer Jan Schoeman said the employer body was "cautiously optimistic" about a deal but it had ruled out a separate process to discuss rearranged collective bargaining.
Should, as Numsa has suggested, collective bargaining include large employers such as vehicle companies and refineries, small businesses would be effectively squeezed out.
"It would be the beginning of the end for small businesses if we allowed that to happen," he said.
Jim said the union would continue to push its resolution for a rethink of collective bargaining, saying resistance came from certain employers who were "anticollective bargaining".
Failure to consider a new "mega-bargaining" council would mean "we would continue with a system not in the best interest of workers and in the best interest of the economy", he said.
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LABOUR NEWS:

AMPLATS CONFIDENT OF SETTLING WAGE DISPUTE WITH NUM-EYEWITNESS NEWS

JOHANNESBURG – Anglo American Platinum says it’s confident it will reach an agreement with the National Union of Mineworkers (NUM) which has declared a wage dispute with the company after talks deadlocked.

The company has offered workers a wage increase of 6.75 percent, while the union is demanding 14.35%.

The NUM, whose members make up a fifth of the workforce at Amplats, has accused management at the mine of insulting its members after it failed to meet their proposed offer.

The union’s Livhuwani Mammburu says the Commission for Conciliation, Mediation and Arbitration may have to intervene.

"The CCMA has to come on board, so it means that the negotiations are going to be held under the auspices of the CCMA."

Anglo American Platinum’s Mpumi Sithole says they are still negotiating with the union.

"In fact we’re very confident that we’ll find each other very soon."

Amplats, which is in the process of selling its labour intensive Rustenburg mines to Sibanye Resources, is also in wage talks with its majority union, Association of Mineworkers and Construction Union, which lead a crippling five-month long strike against the sector in 2014.
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