• Public Service Co-ordinating Bargaining Council

    Public Service Co-ordinating Bargaining Council

    A Bargaining Council positioned to advance and influence change in the labour market environment

  • Public Service Co-ordinating Bargaining Council

    Public Service Co-ordinating Bargaining Council

    Promoting sound labour relations through collective bargaining and dispute management both locally and internationally

  • Public Service Co-ordinating Bargaining Council

    Public Service Co-ordinating Bargaining Council

    Our Values
    Integrity; Efficiency; Accountability; Good Governance and Equity

  • Public Service Co-ordinating Bargaining Council

    Public Service Co-ordinating Bargaining Council

    Promoting sound labour relations through collective bargaining and dispute management both locally and internationally

  • Public Service Co-ordinating Bargaining Council

    Public Service Co-ordinating Bargaining Council

    A Bargaining Council positioned to advance and influence change in the labour market environment

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Welcome to the PSCBC

Welcome to the website for the Public Service Co-ordinating Bargaining Council (PSCBC) which aims to provide comprehensive information regarding the PSCBC as a co-ordinating bargaining council and its functions.

We trust that you will find this website both informative and of value  

Our Vision

A Bargaining Council positioned to advance and influence change in the labour market environment

Our Mission

Promoting sound labour relations through collective bargaining and dispute management both locally and internationally

Our Values

Integrity
Efficiency
Accountability
Good Governance
Equity

Facebook Posts

LABOUR NEWS:

ACTION OVER SALARIES TO HEAT UP AT NECSA – BUSINESS DAY

Trade unions at the Nuclear Energy Corporation of SA (Necsa), representing all employees from labourers to scientists, say they will strike on Tuesday over wage demands.
Necsa, which hopes to play a big role in SA’s new nuclear procurement, is under financial stress with a range of unresolved management problems.
The state-owned company manufactures medical isotopes for export and manages the disposal of nuclear waste, which would be disrupted by a prolonged strike.
The National Education, Health and Allied Workers Union (Nehawu) and the Pelindaba Workers Union said on Sunday that wage negotiations with Necsa had proved fruitless.
They are asking for a 12% raise for those who earn R300,000 and below and rises of 7%-10% for other earnings categories.
Necsa first offered no increase for three years and now proposes a 5.6% hike for workers earning below R600,000 and 4.6% for those earning above R600,000.
Zolani Masoleng, Nehawu’s branch chairman at Necsa, said a strike was the only means workers had to raise salaries.
"The main reason we are not budging in terms of salary increase is because this is the only instrument that we have to increase our salaries, as (Necsa) does not have any performance management system to reward good performance," Masoleng said.
The union claims that Necsa CEO Phumzile Tshelane, who is on a month-to-month contract, received a R600,000 increase in 2015. It also complains of poor governance. There are two court actions under way against Tshelane: one to have him placed on probation as a director; the other to have him declared delinquent.
Necsa said negotiations with unions would continue until there was a resolution. Necsa remained optimistic that an amicable agreement would be reached.
Necsa chairman Kelvin Kemm said its workers had had above-inflation wage increases each year for the past four years.
Kemm said the nuclear reactor Safari-1 would not be shut down. Export of medical isotopes might be affected, depending on the length of the strike, because medical isotopes had a short shelf life.
"It is possible to get through, but it would not be good for SA’s image," he said.
The company said it had contingency plans to ensure the absolute safety of its plant and people if a strike were to take place. It would ensure that there were no interruptions of "essential services at its critical functions" and that none of its subsidiaries operating at the Pelindaba site not involved in the negotiations would be affected.
The company said any strike would have minimal disturbance of business operations.
The two unions represent 1,000 of Necsa’s 1,200 scientists, engineers, technicians and artisans.
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LABOUR NEWS:

COMPANIES FACE MYRIAD LABOUR LAWS ON MOVING INTO AFRICA – BUSINESS DAY

Growing economic integration between SA and its continental peers may ultimately see local companies obligated to retain employees even when they move parts of their operations offshore.
In the interim, South African companies have to grapple with different labour regimes and increasingly assertive watchdogs as they balance restructuring with labour law compliance.
There is no single labour regulatory framework on the continent governing cross-border company movements, so companies have to comply with a multiplicity of laws, says Bowman Gilfillan head of employment and benefits Chris Todd.
Regulations governing employee rights and conditions of service when a company undertakes a cross-border merger or acquisition fall under national jurisdictions.
However, the global trend is to move towards regulatory conformity, says Todd, whose law firm on Thursday hosted a seminar on the pan-African perspective.
Retaining employment rights and conditions of service when a company changes hands has been a key demand from organised labour, which views mergers as a threat to job security.
Labour unions also see outsourcing and companies moving operations offshore as a "race to the bottom" for wages and conditions of service.
Other African countries are placing more obligations on firms entering their markets in terms of retaining jobs and contributing to economic development.
Competition authorities, including in SA, are increasingly including public interest stipulations — such as no merger-related retrenchments — when approving transfers of ownership, particularly when a foreign firm is involved.
"Parties doing business across jurisdictions are going to have to accept that local regulators will impose conditions in their national interest," says Todd.
Talita Laubscher, a partner in employment practice at Bowman Gilfillan, said there was no legal clarity on post-merger restructuring that easily differentiated between job losses as a result of a merger and those for broader operational requirements.
There had been some guidance from the labour court, but how the Competition Tribunal would define causality was not yet established, said Laubscher.
"Hopefully, we will have cross-pollination between the Labour Court and the Competition Commission, to come up with a common test," said Laubscher.
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LABOUR NEWS:

FIRED SABC JOURNALISTS WANT JOBS BACK – BUSINESS DAY

Lawyers for seven fired SABC journalists have demanded that the broadcaster withdraw their termination notices in light of its unexpected turnaround on its ban to air violent protests.
SABC attorney Titus Mchunu said on Wednesday that the broadcaster would abide by the Independent Communications Authority of SA’s (Icasa’s) order to withdraw the ban and would not be launching a court review.
The SABC has been fending off legal attacks from all sides over its decision to ban the broadcast of footage where public property is damaged during protests. While it has backtracked on its decision, it is unclear whether it will continue to defend its summary dismissal of seven journalists who objected to the policy.
Icasa spokesman Paseka Maleka confirmed the SABC’s position, saying the broadcaster had told Icasa that "it will abide by the order of council with immediate effect".
The SABC has also capitulated in its urgent, interim battle in the high court with the Helen Suzman Foundation over the policy, agreeing to the interdict to stop implementation of the policy.
In a letter, law firm Norton Rose Fulbright, which represents the seven fired journalists who objected to the policy, called on the SABC urgently to "withdraw the termination notices that had been addressed to our clients. Please also let us know when our clients can return to work," the letter said.
The fired journalists — Foeta Krige, Thandeka Gqubule, Suna Venter, Busisiwe Ntuli, Krivani Pillay, Lukhanyo Calata and Jacques Steenkamp — were joined by SABC contractor Vuyo Mvoko in filing new court papers in the Constitutional Court on Wednesday.
In the papers, they said their dismissal — in the face of pending legal action both in the Labour Court and the Constitutional Court — amounted to contempt of court by the SABC. Last week, they directly and urgently approached the highest court, saying the protest policy and the disciplinary action against them were unlawful and unconstitutional.
Krige, Venter, Pillay and Steenkamp also went to the Labour Court to put their disciplinary proceedings on hold pending a decision by the Constitutional Court. Their case will be heard on Thursday.
But instead, the SABC summarily fired all of them — except Mvoko, who was on contract.
In an affidavit, Gqubule said once litigation was launched, the SABC was under a duty "not to impede or frustrate the ability of opposing parties to obtain effective relief". Their dismissals appeared "calculated to frustrate and impede" the court cases, she said.
"It is difficult to imagine how the SABC could have shown less respect for this court and our rights," Gqubule said.
Given what had happened so far, the eight were "deeply pessimistic" that they would get effective relief from the Labour Court, she said. The SABC’s conduct had confirmed their fears that the broadcaster would act to silence dissent — "even where this amounts to undermining the authority of the courts". This was why it was necessary for the case to be heard urgently by the highest court, she said.
Parliament’s communications portfolio committee chairman Humphrey Maxegwana said on Wednesday the committee was "deeply concerned" by recent developments at the SABC.
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Yesterday the PSCBC commemorated Mandela Day by spending their 67 minutes with the 10th Commandment Community Care Centre (10th CCCC) occupants in Tembisa.

Occupants at the Centre were treated to a scrumptious meal and other goodies whilst the PSCBC staff renovated the exterior of the 10th CCCC building.

The day turned out to be a true reflection on what the Madiba spirit stands for which is "We must use time wisely and forever realize that the time is always ripe to do right."
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LABOUR NEWS:

NUMSA SET TO STRIKE OVER ESKOM DEMANDS – BUSINESS DAY

The National Union of Metalworkers of SA (Numsa) is threatening industrial action at Eskom, while other labour unions are set to begin bargaining with the utility over wage demands.
Numsa, which has declared deadlock, picketed on Monday outside Eskom head office Megawatt Park to hand over a memorandum of demands that includes a 20% wage hike.
Vuyo Bikitsha, Numsa’s electricity sector co-ordinator, said the union wanted a R5,000 housing allowance, performance bonuses — in line with those of executives — and the right to bargain on behalf of managerial staff.
Although Numsa and Eskom held a conciliation meeting on July 7, Bikitsha said: "We are preparing for a strike. We are still consulting with our national office and legal representatives."
The National Union of Mineworkers (NUM) on Monday referred a dispute to the Commission for Conciliation, Mediation and Arbitration. Of the about 36,000 Eskom employees, the NUM represents about 16,000 members, while Numsa has about 10,000 and Solidarity has 7,300.
Eskom is offering 7%-9% in year one, inflation plus 1% in year two and five months fully paid maternity leave.
The NUM said the offer was an "insult". The union wants 12%-13% in a one-year agreement.
A key grievance in the negotiations is the NUM’s allegation of racial and gender pay disparities.
Solidarity has called on the NUM and Numsa to review their demands, citing improved offers from the utility and a need to reach agreement quickly.
Deon Reyneke, Solidarity deputy general secretary for the energy sector, said: "We believe it is crucial that all role players should now try to reach a favourable agreement around the negotiation table, that would assure the sustainability of Eskom, and ensure stability in the power supply."
Eskom spokesman Khulu Phasiwe said the utility remained hopeful of an agreement.
"We have been approaching these negotiations with a very open-minded approach, in which we could be influenced, but generally the unions have been sticking to their guns," said Phasiwe.
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