• Public Service Co-ordinating Bargaining Council

    Public Service Co-ordinating Bargaining Council

    A Bargaining Council positioned to advance and influence change in the labour market environment

  • Public Service Co-ordinating Bargaining Council

    Public Service Co-ordinating Bargaining Council

    Promoting sound labour relations through collective bargaining and dispute management both locally and internationally

  • Public Service Co-ordinating Bargaining Council

    Public Service Co-ordinating Bargaining Council

    Our Values
    Integrity; Efficiency; Accountability; Good Governance and Equity

  • Public Service Co-ordinating Bargaining Council

    Public Service Co-ordinating Bargaining Council

    Promoting sound labour relations through collective bargaining and dispute management both locally and internationally

  • Public Service Co-ordinating Bargaining Council

    Public Service Co-ordinating Bargaining Council

    A Bargaining Council positioned to advance and influence change in the labour market environment

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Welcome to the PSCBC

Welcome to the website for the Public Service Co-ordinating Bargaining Council (PSCBC) which aims to provide comprehensive information regarding the PSCBC as a co-ordinating bargaining council and its functions.

We trust that you will find this website both informative and of value  

Our Vision

A Bargaining Council positioned to advance and influence change in the labour market environment

Our Mission

Promoting sound labour relations through collective bargaining and dispute management both locally and internationally

Our Values

Integrity
Efficiency
Accountability
Good Governance
Equity

Facebook Posts

LABOUR NEWS:

SUSPENDED TREASURER'S HEARING TO BE HELD AT THE CCMA-BUSINESS DAY

SUSPENDED SAA treasurer Cynthia Stimpel has won a small but important victory in the Labour Court after the national airline agreed to hold her disciplinary hearing at the Commission for Conciliation, Mediation and Arbitration (CCMA).
The hearing had been scheduled to take place at SAA, which has become increasingly notorious for victimising employees who speak out.
Stimpel exposed the now-infamous deal between the airline and little-known "boutique" financier BnP Capital, which stood to score a R256m success fee for sourcing R15bn to restructure the carrier’s debt. The fee was inflated to at least three times that of competitors.
The Organisation for Undoing Tax Abuse (Outa) has supported Stimpel through her legal challenge and it, in turn, has been given pro bono support by law firm Webber Wentzel.
Ivan Herselman, Outa legal director, said: "This is a victory for Cynthia and for Outa, her chances of being acquitted of all these charges is much higher and much more likely."
Herselman said this "is like a first-stage victory for a whistleblower against victimisation".
"If we can succeed — and I am sure we will — it will mean that we have proven whistle-blowers can be protected from becoming victims of intimidation at state-owned entities," he said.
Outa’s ability to do its work "depends on the quality of information we receive regarding any wrongdoing in state structures", he said.
Stimpel had provided information to Outa that "put us in a position to successfully challenge the planned unlawful payment of more than R250m".
"This will allow us to continue doing other projects — we must win the confidence of future whistleblowers, that they can, and will, be protected," Herselman said.
Before approaching Outa, Stimpel had spent months raising the alarm about the deal and discussed her concerns at length with acting chief financial officer Phumeza Nhantsi without luck. She then made the protected disclosure.
Employees who make such disclosures are protected from being subjected to harassment, dismissal or nonpromotion. Stimpel had applied to the court to interdict the disciplinary hearing.
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LABOUR NEWS:

PREGNANT AND STUCK IN A QUEUE – THE TIMES

New mothers and heavily pregnant women on maternity leave are queuing for months and sometimes nearly a year after giving birth for financial assistance from the government - even though the Unemployment Insurance Fund continues to swell, with R110-billion in surplus funds accumulated.
The fund provides short-term relief to workers when they are unemployed, or not working because of maternity or adoption leave, or illness. It also gives relief to the dependants of dead contributors.
But, as with all other claims on the fund, payments during maternity leave are not guaranteed.
Though the fund prides itself on processing applications within weeks, an investigation by The Times has established that some women go for months, and even up to a year, without receiving maternity benefits.
Fund spokesman Makhosonke Buthelezi denies that there is a backlog.
He said claims were often delayed by the submission of incomplete documents and because employment records had not been updated by the employer.
"We pay benefits for all claims submitted to the fund, as long as they meet all requirements and comply with stipulated conditions and time frames."
Buthelezi was "unable to say" how many complaints the fund receives.
On a visit to the fund's office in Randburg, northern Johannesburg, last month, The Times saw officials ignoring ringing phones. There was at least one phone call every two minutes.
According to the fund's 2015 annual report, 97232 of the total of 729,730 claims made to the UIF were for maternity or adoption benefits with nearly R819-million paid out. The fund paid just over R7-billion for all claims processed in that period, most of them, totalling just over R5.8-billion, for unemployment benefits.
The fund received 47,943 fewer claims in 2014-2015 than in the previous financial year.
Diepkloof, Soweto, resident Nnditsheni Nzimande, who was retrenched while on maternity leave, is at her wits' end.
She calls her local UIF office every two weeks and goes there every month to get an update on her maternity benefits. She made her application to the fund in January.
Because her maternity benefits application has not been finalised, she is unable to claim unemployment benefits.
"I keep being told that while my application has been received and can be found on the system, it has not been approved. It's been an emotionally, psychologically and physically draining experience."
Nzimande, a training facilitator, said her family was barely surviving on her husband's salary, which covered only their rent and car payments. They depend on their parents for their baby's needs and for food.
Cosmo City, Johannesburg, resident, Annie Modira* submitted her application to the Randburg office of the fund in July 2015, just days before her baby was born.
She visits the office every three weeks, queuing for nearly four hours each time.
"Every time I'm given an excuse about why my claim has not been paid. I have lost count of the forms I have resubmitted because officials keep misplacing them."
Modira, who was earning 75% of her salary during her maternity leave, said she had to borrow money from friends and relatives to make up her income shortfall.
"I spend money every time I visit the office but I don't think they care.
"The system is flawed and officials aren't forthcoming about the information."
Kimberley teacher Baleseng Maeneche submitted a claim for only one of the four months she was on maternity leave because she was "fed up" with the incompetence of fund officials.
"Getting one payment was a nightmare. I was victimised by an official for not being poor enough."
* Not her real name
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LABOUR NEWS:

PANEL STARTS WORK ON MINIMUM WAGE PLAN – BUSINESS DAY

The seven economists appointed to set the country’s minimum wage began their work on Thursday with the biggest labour federation in SA warning the state to approach the process with urgency.
The panel, appointed by Deputy President Cyril Ramaphosa, held meetings with National Economic Development and Labour Council (Nedlac) constituents to receive input on a minimum wage floor.
The panel is expected to announce a floor in two months.
Nedlac spokeswoman Kim Jurgensen said on Thursday the panel had met with constituents to establish positions and what informed them. More meetings were scheduled for coming weeks.
In his 2014 state of the nation address, President Jacob Zuma first announced that Ramaphosa would lead a process to determine a minimum wage as part of broader efforts to tackle economic inequality and labour instability.
The Congress of South African Trade Unions (Cosatu) said the process was meant to have been concluded in June 2015 and warned against further delays.
"We hope the government, in line with the mandate from the ruling party, will instruct its negotiators to approach this matter with the necessary urgency and focus.
"We caution big business that any delaying tactics will be rejected by labour, as well as any attempts to entrench the current ultralow wage structure," Cosatu said.
In May 2016, Cosatu said the process had reached deadlock after failure to agree on a minimum wage level that would protect growth while tackling inequality.
The state has proposed a floor of between R2,000 to R3,000 a month, business about R1,800 — or a floor close to the lowest sectoral determination, to make it as broad as possible — and Cosatu between R4,125 and R5,276.
The panel will be chaired by Imraan Valodia‚ a part-time member of the Competition Tribunal as well as a commissioner on the Employment Conditions Commission.
Other members include Mamokete Lijane, an Aluwani Capital Partners strategist; Debbie Collier, an associate professor in the department of commercial law at the University of Cape Town; Murray Leibbrandt, pro vice-chancellor — poverty and inequality at the University of Cape Town; Siphokazi Koyana, a skills development and training expert; Oxfam economic justice programme head Ayabonga Cawe; and Patrick Belser, a senior economist at the International Labour Organisation.
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LABOUR NEWS:

EXTENDING UNEMPLOYMENT BENEFITS 'HAS PITFALLS'– BUSINESS DAY

Providing unemployment cover for people who resign and those who work in the informal sector, as recommended by the National Economic Development and Labour Council (Nedlac), is fraught with problems.
The Unemployment Insurance Fund (UIF) has an accumulated surplus of about R120bn and benefits have been extended to make use of it.
A bill before the National Council of Provinces aims to extend unemployment benefits to 12 months from eight months, provide cover for scholars undergoing training and public servants, and increase maternity benefits.
UIF commissioner Boas Seruwe has in the past supported widening the net of beneficiaries and said the fund had resources for it.
Labour Department chief director of labour market policy, Thembinkosi Mkalipi, said in a briefing to MPs that Nedlac — in particular the labour constituency — had requested that informal and self-employed workers be provided with unemployment insurance, as well as those who resigned and had no alternative employment.
The department is not keen to adopt these proposals immediately, without first investigating their cost implications and Nedlac has mandated it to evaluate them 18 months after the promulgation of the bill. This time has lapsed because of delays in Parliament dealing with the bill, and Nedlac has agreed the department should begin looking into the proposals.
Mkalipi said including the informal sector and the self-employed would place strain on the fund and raises the problem of defining when a person in the informal sector became unemployed.
Providing for paternity leave — another Nedlac proposal — would be affordable if the informal sector was not included within the ambit of the fund, he said.
Covering those who resigned would have cost implications and there was the possibility that benefit payments would exceed income if this was introduced. The income replacement rate might have to be lowered if this proposal was adopted, Mkalipi said.
The department was reluctant to create an incentive for people to leave their jobs to access benefits.
An actuarial assessment of the proposal read it could be implemented but would have a significant effect on the fund and should be phased in over time.
Director-general Thobile Lamati said the department did not want to "run into trouble by extending benefits only to remove them later when the fund could not afford them". Those working in the informal sector were vulnerable and the government wanted to extend social protection to them.
DA MP Michael Bagraim opposed benefits being extended to the informal sector, and warned it would be "incredibly dangerous" as there was no accurate assessment of the number of people involved.
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LABOUR NEWS:

SUGAR TAX COULD COST 70 000 JOBS – BUSINESS DAY

THE Beverage Association of SA, whose members include almost all manufacturers of nonalcoholic drinks in the country, has warned that up to 70,000 jobs in the industry could be lost if the Treasury’s mooted tax on sugar-sweetened drinks were implemented in its current form.
This is the first time the industry has put a number to the potential ramifications for employment since the proposed tax was published for public comment in July.
The findings are based on an independent study conducted by Oxford Economics and commissioned by the association.
The study found the proposed tax would result in 60,000-70,000 workers losing their jobs. About 60% of the jobs lost would be direct, upstream jobs, says the report.
SA would be following in the footsteps of countries such as Mexico, Mauritius and Hungary, which have implemented the tax to tackle rising obesity and diabetes rates.
Experts forecast that the proposed levy could raise up to R4.5bn in revenue, relieving pressure on the fiscus. However, having already shed about 500,000 jobs in 2016, the country can ill afford to lose any more.
The Treasury’s proposal is for a tax of 2.9c per gram of sugar in all sugar-sweetened drinks. This could raise the price of popular soft drinks, such as Coca-Cola, about 20% — making the tax rate one of the highest in the world. In Mexico, which has a similar tax, the rate is about 10%.
On Tuesday, Phil Gutsche, chairman of Coca-Cola Beverages Africa, the largest bottler of Coke products on the continent, called on stakeholders to assist the industry in opposing the proposed tax to save jobs.
Beverage Association of SA executive director Mapule Ncanywa said the organisation had told the Treasury on numerous occasions that taxing a single category of food would not be effective in tackling obesity and diseases, such as diabetes, that resulted from excessive sugar intake. Sugar-sweetened beverages accounted for only about 3% of total daily calorie consumption, she said.
"If sugar is the problem, why not go straight for the source?" asked Ncanywa.
The Food and Allied Workers Union (Fawu) said it supported the government’s initiatives to tackle health challenges in the country. But it said it would have a problem with the proposed tax if it resulted in the volume of job losses the industry predicted.
"We cannot add an extra 70,000 workers to our existing army of unemployed," Fawu general secretary Katishi Masemola said.
The deadline for public comments on the policy paper is August 22.
The Treasury has said the tax will come into effect in April 2017.
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